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Make-your-own Ramen Burger

27 Aug

Food trends are interesting. The major cities usually get them, and often the start of a food trend is NYC. One of the biggest food trends is the Cronut. According to the website the shop opens at 8:00 am and if you want a good chance to get a Cronut, you need to arrive by 6:00 am and wait in line for 2.5 hours. 2.5 hours? Are you kidding me? I hate to queue for an hour let alone that long. These Cronuts better be Manna from heaven given the way you have to wait to get them. Luckily, these food trends seem to spread, and since the word Cronut is trademarked, they just call them something different. In London, we’ve seen several different types of Cronuts (or Cro-doughs, or Dossants or whatever people want to call them) and luckily the queue for these don’t seem to be quite as bad. (At least at some places and for now.)

One of the newest NYC food trends is the Ramen burger. What is this you ask? Well it’s a burger sandwiched between a Ramen noodle “bun”. Sounds interesting, and when I pointed it out to some friends, we all wondered about how quickly something like this might take to come to London. Another friend pointed me toward a video that shows you how to make a Ramen bun, or there’s this recipe that shows how to make a Ramen burger as well. That’s the bun down, but I don’t know, the idea of just slapping any old burger and cheese on this burger seemed liked something that was added as an afterthought, so I decided to gourmet it up a bit and go full on Asian-style Ramen burger with a duck burger instead of your standard beef and American cheese. This included using Miso in the “bun” and making some crispy caramelized onions to go on it. I also opted for using Hoisin sauce as a condiment for the burger. I served it up with a salad with miso dressing (Sweet white miso, rice wine vinegar and sesame oil) and some oven baked chips (although if I was doing it for company, I’d probably do my own in my new deep fryer.).

I have to say it went extremely well! On some level, I miss having the bread encasing the burger to soak up the juices, so the Ramen burger gets a bit messy, but tasty. And it was my first attempt, and it did seem like a lot of work. When I mentioned to my Guinea Pig Tom (as a home chef, your partner is always your test subject for trying new things) that I wasn’t sure it was worth it, he commented that he really liked it, so maybe it was just me, or maybe I just need to find a way to kick it up a bit more on the Asian scale. The only complaint he had was that it was massive, so I definitely need to find a way to scale it down a bit.

Ingredients:

(For the bun)

  • Ramen noodles (I ended up using one package per “bun” so I used two packages in total)
  • Eggs (Again, I used about one egg per “bun”, but I didn’t use all of it at the end)
  • Sweet White Miso
  • Grapeseed oil
  • Sesame oil
  • Buttered ramekins
  • Parchment paper

(For the burger)

  • Two duck breasts (skin off)
  • About 100g of streaky bacon
  • Powdered ginger
  • Salt and pepper to taste

(To assemble)

  • Emmental cheese
  • Hoisin sauce
  • Gem lettuce
  • Crispy fried onions

To make the bun:

  1. Cook Ramen noodles according to instructions on packet. Once cooked, refrigerate for approx. 15 minutes to cool noodles.
  2. Whisk eggs and miso (Sorry I don’t usually measure things so mix what you think is good).
  3. Add egg mix to cooled noodles. Once mixed, portion into buttered ramekins and press down. Place parchment over top of noodles and place smaller ramekins (or something equally as heavy as seen in the video: cans or whatever) on top of parchment to compress noodles. Refrigerate for approx. 15 minutes.
  4. Heat a mix of grapeseed and sesame oils in a pan on medium to medium-high heat. After noodles have been refrigerated, slowly invert the ramekins into the pan and shake slightly to remove the noodles. Let cook for about 5-6 minutes per side in order to get crisp. Once finished save the oil to fry the burgers in.

For the burgers:

I must warn you that I have a kitchen full of lovely kitchen gadgets. If this is too much work for you, or you don’t have the gadgets, feel free to prepare any sort of burger you choose to go with it. I really thought duck would be nice so I went for it, but a regular burger would probably be good as well.

  1. Cut up the duck breasts and bacon into chunks. (Since most of the fat is under the skin, using the bacon adds a bit more fat to hold the burgers together). Using a meat grinder on the largest grind, grind the chunks of duck breast and bacon. (If you don’t have a meat grinder, I’ve been told that you can use a food processor but you might not get quite as nice of a grind. Or you can be meticulous and chop up the meat by hand. Your choice.)
  2. Add salt and pepper (to taste) and powdered ginger and mix. Form into two patties (although you could probably get away with three or four smaller ones given how massive mine were).
  3. Cook them in your favorite way to cook burgers. Mine is to seal them into vacuum pouches and cook them in a water bath at 57 C for an hour. This ensures the duck is a perfect medium rare pink in the middle. I then sear them for about a minute on each side using a medium-high heat in order to get a nice charred brown outside. I like to cook them this way, as the hour cooking time for the burger gave me enough time to prepare the buns, and by time the buns were finished so were the burgers!

For the onions:

  1. Heat a pan on medium-low heat.
  2. Thinly slice an onion (I like to cut mine in half and then slice them into half moons).
  3. Add a generous amount of olive oil (or olive oil mixed with butter) to the pan and add the onions.
  4. Slow cook them for about an hour

To assemble:

  1. Start with a bottom “bun”
  2. Add some onions and lettuce
  3. Place a burger on top and some cheese.
  4. Add the hoisin sauce
  5. Place the top “bun”

Voila! You have a ramen burger. I actually put the cheese on the top bun in order to let it melt a bit since the bun was hot. I also might recommend putting the lettuce on top of the burger as it did make the burger slide around a bit, but really the ordering is up to you and what you like. And really, if making your own burger meat is too much work, just use whatever you like. I wanted to give it a bit of an Asian flare, but beef (or chicken) with a teriyaki sauce glaze would probably be equally as tasty on a Ramen bun. And any toppings you want would be nice as well. A fried duck egg on top would probably be delicious too! The nice thing about burgers is that they are customizable according to your tastes.

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6 Comments

Posted by on August 27, 2013 in Burger

 

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6 responses to “Make-your-own Ramen Burger

  1. StefanGourmet

    August 27, 2013 at 11:03 PM

    Very original recipe! I had never heard of a ramen burger before, or of a cronut for that matter. I found your post because I was browsing for sous-vide recipes. Interesting idea to make a duck burger. How about using the duck skin rather than bacon to add some fat?

     
    • Grant

      August 27, 2013 at 11:10 PM

      Hmm. That’s an interesting idea. I’m slightly concerned about the chewiness of the skin in the meat, or what happens if I try to pass it through the meat grinder (even with freezing the grinder and chilling the meat, I still get some that gets stuck around the blades). What I didn’t say in this is that when I make duck burgers and pull off the skin, I’ll cook it in the oven between two 8 inch bake pans with some bake beans in the top pan in order to get a crispy bit of skin that’s great to just eat on its own. I’ve usually done either bacon or pork belly to give it a bit more fat/flavor. (As I’ve actually made the burgers before, without the ramen buns).

       
      • StefanGourmet

        August 27, 2013 at 11:20 PM

        Hi Grant, the chewiness should be alright, but I suppose you could chop the skin before grinding it? The crispy duck skin you mention could also be nice as a condiment on the burger, perhaps instead of cheese? I love cheese but the emmenthal did look a bit out of place in your recipe.
        Very inspiring post — I’ll have to try something similar for sure!
        I just checked out some of your other posts. Would love to read more about what you cook and I hope you’ll check out my blog as well :-)

         
  2. Grant

    August 28, 2013 at 10:29 AM

    Yeah, I know the cheese is a bit out of place, but I just really love cheese on burgers. I went with Emmental due to it being fairly mild, but having a nice nutty flavor. I thought it would just go well. It’s hard to find a cheese to pair with Asian flavors I suppose. I didn’t want to go with a sharp cheddar or a blue, and that just seemed right to me. Maybe I’ll give the skin a whirl through the grinder next time. All of my gadgets are fairly new so it’s a matter of learning what works. That’s what experimentation is for!

     
  3. lynnsbooks

    August 28, 2013 at 6:47 PM

    Hey Grant. These look great – I must admit it does seem quite a bit of work – but, who would have thought of ramen noodle buns! You can’t help thinking it will all fall apart or crumble once you start eating??
    Lynn :D

     
    • Grant

      August 29, 2013 at 7:39 AM

      Well whoever invented them in NYC did! :)

      It actually held together okay until the end. But it wasn’t nearly as bad as it could have been. If you make sure there’s a nice crispy crust on them it does hold them together slightly better.

       

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